Creating fake news

Fake news is supposedly a new phenomenon. The term was invented by the corporate media mere months ago. They use it attack anyone who has the audacity to challenge their narratives. However, fake news is not new. It is as old as journalism itself.

 

Back in 1924, just four days before a general election, the Daily Mail and the Times published a letter from Zinoviev, the Chairman of the Communist International in the Soviet Union. The letter instructed British communists to enage in treason and terrorism. The letter instructed the communists to organise within the Labour Party and to use agitprop to undermine morale in the armed forces. The Mail and the Times made much of the letter, rather hysterically emphasising the supposed threat to democracy and national security.

 

Howver, the letter was a forgery. It had been provided to the newspapers and Conservative Party leaders by the intelligence service for the purpose of ensuring the Labour Party would lose the election.

 

MI6 had received the forgery from White Russians in Riga, who wanted a Conservative government in England as they hoped such a government would provide them with more assistance in their war against the Soviet Union.

 

Major Ball, the Head of MI6's B Branch, who passed the forgery to the Conservative Party Central Office, later moved to the Central Office, where he pioneered the dark arts of political spin, specifically by using intelligence for party purposes.

 

The parallels with contemporary events could hardly be more obvious. Sensational stories appear in supposedly reputable newspapers based on anonymous sources, who are often intelligence agents, promoting political propaganda. Indeed, the only real difference is that the intelligence agencies are prepared to public statements, a supposed openness that merely makes it easier for them to pass off blatantly false information as authorative to all those who are not paying attention or are wilfully blind.

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Comments (14)

  1. wirelessguru1

    It used to just be called “propaganda”…

    May 15, 2017
    1. stevehayes13

      No, the term propaganda does not include lies. Propaganda is the use of information to promote a particular position.

      May 16, 2017
      1. wirelessguru1

        On the contrary. Propaganda is usually full of lies…
        WAKE UP!

        May 16, 2017
  2. magnocrat

    I gotta give to you Steve you really dig deep.

    May 15, 2017
  3. cusijaimeflores

    How do you know all this stuff?

    May 15, 2017
    1. wirelessguru1

      Maybe because he is smarter than you! LOL!!!

      May 15, 2017
    2. stevehayes13

      If you want to know something, you find out. It is that simple and that mundane. For example, say you want to know whether or not there is bread in the cupboard – do not try to know by thinking about it or asking someone or just guessing – rather just look.

      May 16, 2017
  4. cusijaimeflores

    Well I wouldn’t be surprised, I’m only 13

    May 15, 2017
    1. wirelessguru1

      You shouldn’t be on-line here, so no wonder I BLOCKED you.

      May 15, 2017
      1. GovMisdirection

        Blocked by you! This kid must be a friggin genius.

        May 16, 2017
        1. wirelessguru1

          ..and you’re still a moron!

          May 16, 2017
  5. cusijaimeflores

    Yeah, here that, a genius!

    May 16, 2017
    1. wirelessguru1

      That moron (GovMisdirection) thinks that you’re a genius now! LOL!!!

      May 16, 2017
  6. cusijaimeflores

    Now and always.

    May 16, 2017